Satellite and International Space Station crews are tracking the progress of the deadly record-breaking tropical storm Elsa along the Florida coast.
According to the National Hurricane Center’s forecast, from Tuesday to Wednesday (July 6 to July 7), the state receives a hurricane warning at night, and it is expected that there will be strong winds across the east coast of the United States by Friday. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Storm
formed on July 1, and was the fifth earliest named storm ever formed in the Atlantic Ocean. The US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration stated in another update on Tuesday that although tropical storm Edward formed last year on July 6, 2020, it would normally take until the end of August to have so many severe storms in the area. (The Atlantic hurricane season lasts from June 1 to November 1. 30 times a year.

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Related: Hurricane Season 2021: How Long Will It Last and What Will Happen? NASA astronaut Megan MacArthur captured Tropical Storm Elsa
in the Caribbean from the International Space Station. NASA astronaut Megan MacArthur photographed Tropical Storm Elsa
from the International Space Station in the Caribbean. (Image source: NASA)
“The Air Force Reserve Hurricane Chaser found that # Elsa’s maximum sustained wind speed is close to 110 km / h [70 mph],” the Center posted Tuesday National Hurricane a tropical storm on Twitter. the Florida landing, seen through the NOAA GOESEast satellite. The latest generation of GOES satellites are optimized to track extreme weather, including lightning from orbit. NOAA’s
satellite Twitter account paid tribute to Goes EAST’s capabilities in another tweet Tuesday, along with an animation showing points of light across the continental United States. “Thanks to the geosynchronous raymapper, not only can we see a lot of rays, but we can also see #Elsa heading towards Florida,” the account said.
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At the same time, the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration satellite account posted a dramatic animation on Twitter Tuesday, showing bursts of lightning through Elsa, shooting east as the storm was approaching Florida.
NASA also tracks storms via the NASANOAA Suomi National Polarorbiting Partnership (NPP) satellite, which captures a high-resolution hemispheric view of Earth. The agency posted a tweet on Sunday (July 4) about satellite views of Tropical Storm Elsa over Jamaica. NBC News said on the same day that the storm caused at least three deaths after destroying the Caribbean Sea.
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Meteorological satellites in geosynchronous orbits are essential for predicting major storms and hurricanes. As global warming accelerates, the intensity and frequency of these storms and hurricanes will increase. In addition, the staff of the International Space Station can take images of storm weather from their location at an altitude of 400 kilometers (250 miles), providing a closer vantage point.

 

 

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